Pampas grass

Everything You Need to Know About Pampas Grass

From celebrity obsessions to event planning and Instagram, pampas grass has made a household name for itself in the past few years.

Pros and Cons of Pampas Grass

Scientifically named Cortaderia selloana, pampas grass is a plant native to Argentina, Brazil, and Uruguay. But what’s the deal with pampas grass? And is it too later to hop on the trendy bandwagon?

Trendy Aesthetic Decor

This plant is tolerant of drought, salt sprays, and wind and can be found in coastal areas. It can be used to help stabilize erodible banks or dried and used in interior design. Hilary Duff, Jessica Alba, and Chrissy Teagan are just a few of the celebrities who have joined Team Pampas in the past few years. But what’s the big deal?

Decor trends vary year to year, but pampas grass fronds have proved to be a versatile and low-maintenance way to add something natural to your home. Its natural neutral tone fits in well with many different interior and exterior designs. Want something a little bolder? Pink pampas grass adds a pop of color to your home.

Invasive Species

This plant is considered a noxious weed thanks to the speed it grows and seeds. According to the Washington State Noxious Weed Control Board, one pampas grass plant can release as many as 400,000 seeds. Because it grows so quickly, the weed can crowd out native plants and endanger grazing land.

Pampas grass can grow up to 10 ft. tall and has a dry, brushy leaf—making it a major fire hazard in dry areas. Many states and regions, including Hawaii, California, Washington, Australia, and New Zealand have declared pampas grass an invasive species.

Pampas grass can be a great ornamental staple for your landscape, but it’s important to plant and prune fast-spreading plants responsibly. The landscape experts at Purple Care can help you decide on the best plants and design for your dream landscape this summer. Contact the Purple Pros at (817) 369-3138 or on Facebook!

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